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Saturday, April 28, 2012

EVIDENCE of WYNLAND of WEST

WHETSTONES
(SEE LENAPE HISTORY, 
WEEK 14, Part B)
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VIKING VISITORS to NORTH AMEICA
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The most compelling evidence of Norse in America by 1000 is shown in the 1979 film Viking Visitors to North America.
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In 1979 four archaeologists, seven Ph. D.s and 16 knowledgeable scholars combined to produce a film that educators could use in their classrooms to teach students that:

       The Norse were in North America 1,000 years ago,

        There had been a Scandinavian rescue attempt (c 1358) that
         
may have reached western Minnesota, and

The Norse were still in western Minnesota in 13632. 

When the Viking Visitor film was made in 1979, Thomas E. Lee was a researcher for Laval University's Centre for Northern Studies.  Lee died in 1982l.
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The film shows ten artifacts that are still strong evidence for Norse presence in America.  Lee, in the film, apparently, had just received the results of a carbon dating, which confirmed a date for the Norse skull as 1050.  
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The film makes a connection between Ungava Bay and the Kensington Rune Stone in western Minnesota.
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Play the video of VIKING VISITORS, part I. 
                    and VIKING VISITORS. part II. 
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Now, after more than a decade of full time research, the testimony of the Maalan Aarum, the oldest American history, and the evidence of the Carte du Canada, which shows the route of  the Norse Christian Lenape migration from Greenland through Ungava Bay to western Minnesota has become well documented.  See LENAPE LAND.             
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By 2010 the educators of Canada had not promoted this film for 31 years.  Researchers of Norse in America searched diligently and found no reference of the film.  Even the main archaeologist, Thomas E. Lee died disappointed as he awaited the release of the film.
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For a discussion of why the Norse in America evidence is not well known click on evidence vs paradigm.
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.MOORING STONES


Mooring stones are large stones located near natural or man modified harbors.  They have a hole in them about an inch in diameter and four to seven inches deep.  An iron pin connected to the anchor rope of a Viking boat slipped into the hole.
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Other stones with holes in them have been found from Winnipeg Lake in the north, through eastern North Dakota, eastern South Dakota, western Minnesota, to central eastern Iowa.  Stones with holes in them may have been used for many purposes, the most important being boundary markers on the treeless prairie.
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A three man team using good steel tools can sink a hole in a hard stone at the rate of one and a fourth inches per five minutes.  That implies that a typical six inch mooring hole would take a three man team less than 30 minutes.  Or a single man might be able to make a hole in two hours.
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But were "good steel tools" available 1,000 years ago?  The evidence is that they were.  The Viking sword below and the 12,  fourteen century artifacts below are strong evidence.  A recent video showing how the Viking Sword was made is a visual demonstration of the ability of Viking Steel manufacturing.
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A good steel hammer and punch are needed.  Attempts to demonstrate making a mooring hole with a stone hammer resulted in demonstrating how difficult the process is.  But no good steel hammer or punch have been found in North America.  What happened to them?
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Well over 300 stones with holes have been documented by Steve Hilgren, Judi Rudebush, Valdimar Samuelsson, Haljmar Holand and others.  Most stones with a hole in it in this area is an indication of the Norse Christian Lenape culture during the centuries (1,000 to 1, 450) when they were in Wynland of West and on the first stage of their migration to the Atlantic Coast.
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The trail of holes implies that the Lenape used their modern toolS until they were worn out somewhere in southeast Iowa or northeast Missouri.  A blunt punch looks like a farm tool.  Perhaps, if one was picked up, the blunt punch went into the scrap iron bucket that exists on most farms.
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The hammer would have looked like any modern hammer.  The  Vikings knew how to add axes to wooden handles.  A hammer would have been easier.  Again, hammer heads did not change much in a 1,000 years.  Any abandoned hammer head was either restored to use with a new handle or tossed into the scrap iron bucket.
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The hammers and the punches had to be there to make the holes in stones.  The Vikings in America carried in good steel swords, axes, and fire steel.  They must have had punches and hammers.   The Vikings in the boats may not have known how to operate steel making furnaces.  So the punches and hammers were used up or lost.  Now we know what to look for in the basements of agricultural museums.

OTHER WYNLAND of WEST ARTIFACTS
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Steve Hilgren has been searching the area near Wynland of West for more evidence of Ancient Vikings in America. AVA.
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Two of his finds, the Roseau Stone and a harpoon tip, are shown in the AVA photos.
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A new discovery made in late 2011 is this Shubert speartip.


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REPORTS of NORSE SHIPS
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Settlers in Minnesota observed remains of large boats they thought might be Viking ships.  No definite evidence of any ship has been found, although Google Earth's history has an image of what might be a large ship in Mary's Lake.
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But the locations of all 15 reported sightings lay along the transcontinental waterway or at the far eastern end of long lakes connected to the waterway.  This precise distribution of the reported sightings of Viking ships could not have been made by people, who were just telling stories about Vikings.
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Until the reports of Viking boat sightings can be refuted, they remain another valid set of data that Norse were in Minnesota before the 14th century.  
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The VIKING SWORD
The VIKING SWORD ar ULEN, MN


The probable location of Wynland of West was determined after several years of reading ancient written sources, 
talking with colleges, 
re-examining the transcontinental waterway,  
reflecting on Steve Hilgrin's understanding of "Vinland of West" on the Kensington Rune stone,
and, after all the investigation, finally discovering that there was a North and South Wild Rice River in western Minnesota, which might be the location of Adam de Bremen's"self seeded grain."   
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All this data pointed to a location on the high ground somewhere south of the South Wild Rice tributary and north of the Buffalo River.  I put on the Google Earth map of that terrain.  THEN the place names were turned on.  A Google search of the nearby towns was begun to locate possible reference to Norse artifacts.  Three of the closest small town Museums had 14th century Norse artifacts!
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Then, and only then, the Viking Sword of Ulen, MN became known.  This artifact should have been the Coup de Grace of the search for Wynland of West.  The Viking sword had been significant find of an ancient Viking artifact within ten miles of my calculated center of  WynLand of West.
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Unfortunately the people defending the Eurocentric Paradigm, were already aware of the compounded threat of the Viking Sword and the Kensington Rune stone within 89 miles of each other.  For a discussion of viability of the Viking Sword for evidence see evidence vs paradigm.


KENSINGTON RUNE STONE 
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The most solid evidence of Norse in America is the Kensington Rune Stone. (KRS)  Unfortunately the Kensington Rune Stone has been investigated for so long by so many people with an Eurocentric Paradigm, in their mind that it's value as evidence has been been profoundly disturbed.  
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Advocates for the physical authenticity of the KRS have been overwhelmed by passionate advocates of theEurocentric Paradigm,   Each advocate may be able to cite many "experts."
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The essence of the "mystery" game is to prove that an advocate has the RIGHT solution.  All other advocates in the game will immediately respond with their RIGHT interpretation.  The "mystery" game goes on and on.  No one appears to accept the simple explanation.
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The simple explanation is that the KRS was a memorial to 10 Scandinavian men beaten to death in Minnesota in 1362.  The weathering on the KRS is similar to a grave stone that has stood in the Great Plains for centuries.  
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Then dust storms from droughts covered the KSR.  A tree grew in the earth on top of the stone.  The KSR was held in the roots of a tree, when a farmer pulled up the roots.
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Haljmar Holand, a Norwegian, spent a life time studying the Kensington Rune Stone.  In the process he figured out the route of the Transcontinental Waterway by 1928.  He proposed a solution that placed the Kensington Rune Stone in context of a movement of a large boat over the Transcontinental Waterway.
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Most other EurAmericans, at the time, had an Eurocentric Paradigm, which did not allow them to believe a stone with 14th century Swedish text could be in western Minnesota.  So Holand went to Norway to get support from the experts.  
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But, by then, Norwegians had also learned American history and the Eurocentric Paradigm,  Besides the Norwegian authorities had another plank in their eyes.  They were upset that so many young Norwegians were migrating to America.  They believed Holand's research was devised to inspire other Norwegians to come to Minnesota.  

The Norwegians ridiculed Holand and his hypothesis.  The American Social Scientists used the Norwegian "expertise" to cover up Holand's efforts.
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The Kensington Rune Stone is even more evidence that Norse were in America in the 14th century.  But, now, the evidence is not needed.  The stone is now a monument to a century of foolish men, who could not believe text punched into stone.
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SUMMARY
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Thirty eight (38) artifacts show evidence that the Norse were in America before the 14th century.
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The ten harbors and locations of mooring stones located by Holand before 1928 can be viewed by Google Earth.  The Norse may have been in Minnesota because, as a sea faring culture, they were using the  transcontinental waterway to travel through out America. 
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 Modern man can predict the location Wynland of West from ancient testimony and the evidence cited above.
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Wynland of West was south of the south Rice River, above Herman Beach elevation east of the Red River in the USA, near land access to the highest lake of the transcontinental waterway, and near to the north river access to the same water way.
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The hundreds of stones with holes in them testify to the vast region that the Norse Christian Lenape occupied before they migrated to the Atlantic Coast.
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SUPPORTING EVIDENCE
There is other supporting evidence that supports the hypothesis that Norse have been in America from 1000 to the present.  This is evidence away from Wynland of West and the transcontinental waterway from earlier time periods.
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TESTIMONY
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Testimony is marks written on paper or stone for future generations to read.  Click on Testimony.

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