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Thursday, December 13, 2012

VIKING WATERWAY TWO WITINESSES


The VIKINGS were in Wynland (pronounced "Vinland") because the start of the waterway linking the Red River to the Mississippi River was there.  The route had been developed during the copper trading era, 2,200-1,200 BC.

The copper trade to the Mediterranean ended when the Mediterranean was devastated by a catastrophe about 1,200 BC.  The Baltic sea bronze age continued for several more centuries.

After the VIKINGS became Christians in America, about 1,000 AD, they called themselves “LENAPE,” meaning to “abide with the pure.”

At the start of the Little Ice age, the Lenape of Greenland WALKED to Wynland. Scandinavian had come to help the Lenape migrate to the “fine” land.  


Both the Scandinavians and Greenland Lenape thought every thing was going well for the migration of thousands of Lenape.  The Greenlander Lenape history tells of friendly relations in Wynland as Greenland Lenape settled among their kinfolks in a pleasing land.  


Then a shocking mass murder happened.  The shock was amplified because the mass murder occurred among Lenape in a pleasing land and because the ten mates dead were all Scandinavian.


Either of the two reports on the above right tells us that ten mates were beaten to death on the VIKING WATERWAY.

The mates were Scandinavian, not Lenape.  

WHEN this dreadful mass murder occurred. The path of the Lenape migration changed forever.  The Drottkvaett composer and the rune puncher recorded the event so future generations would remember.  Today, 660 years later, we do know that TEN MATES were beaten to death on the VIKING WATERWAY in 1362. 

What happened?
Who might have "done it?"   
Where did the mass murder of 1362 happen?
Why were the Lenape from Greenland migrating?  
When did you learn about this mass murder in your history class?
Where did the Lenape from Greenland and the Lenape in the "fine" land go?  

Did the murders happen in Big Cormorant Lake or Lake Lizzie?  Where was the Kensington Rune Stone punched?  
Was the rune stone moved?
What evidence shows that the KRS was upright for a long time?
Why was the rune stone found face down? 
Are there any objects “out of place” in the surrounding museums?
Why were most of the 14th Century relics found buried?
What evidence shows that the Immigrants were not responsible?   
Did the historians deliberately cover these murders up?

Tuesday, October 9, 2012

ISLAND IN THAT OCEAN.

IMAGINE THIS:
The time is 1,000 years ago.





You are a Scandinavian Captain.  Your boat floats on a lake near [what will be called] North Rice River in [what will be called] Minnesota, USA.

You are looking south.  You see the plateau along the horizon.

You call it "Wyn," which means "fine, smooth, cleared of trees."

Later, Europeans will pronounce "Wyn" as "Vin."
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You have the crew row west to [what will be called] the Red River.


Days later your boat is on a lake near [what will be called] Moorhead, MN.

You see the land to the east is still Wynland.

 The land has looked the same every day.
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The river to the south is not Wyn. 
The river twists and turns across a flat plain. 

It is more marsh than river.
But the crew mucks through to the south.

Then they find a long lake.
That lake is an easy traverse.
You call it "Lake Traverse."  The name will be on the map a thousand years later.

But then comes a hard portage around another swamp.
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Finally, your crew rows across a lake with big stones.  You call it "Big Stone Lake."  That name will be on the map a thousand years later.

Then your crew rows east through a twisting, turning slow moving river.  Men on the hill side are walking faster than your crew can make progress down the river.

There is so much junk in the water that the crew calls the river "Minnesota," which means "Minimum water flowing in a creek bed almost dry."  That name will be on maps a thousand years later, also

But the land to the north is still Wynland.

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Your crew rows on to the east.
There are patches of woods, usually around the many lakes.
The scouts bring back wild grapes and many types of berries.

Men on boats always like to make their brew, when they find grapes.
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The crew portages a little, but they make it into a river they call "Mississippi," which means "Mighty Flowing Waters."

You are determined to see if there is a connection to Wynland. So you make the crew row up the Mississippi toward the North.
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Finally, your latitude device tells you that you are near the headwaters of the North Rice River.  

Your scouts confirm that the North Rice River begins on the other side of the marsh in the Northwest.
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Yet, as you look west you see the Wynland.
  
Your crew is restless.  The days are getting colder.

So they make a mucky portage through the swamp.
  
Then you row for home before the ice closes the gate to the ocean.
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When you get back to Norway, your men will have a great story to tell.

"There is a Wynland in that "ocean discovered by many."

 You know because your crew rowed all the way around Wynland, while they were in the ocean discovered by many!
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WYNLAND is an ISLAND in that OCEAN!
_________________________________
A Horst.
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Wynland of West may be a geographical feature called a Horst.  Wynland may have been uplifted when the Big Event occurred, 13,000 years ago.
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IN AD 1070 ADAM de BREMAN wrote: 
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"... in that ocean discovered by many, which is called Vinland, for the reason that vines grow wild there, which yield the best of wine.  Moreover that grain unseeded grows there abundantly, is not fabulous fancy, but from account of the Danes we know to be a fact."




Thursday, June 14, 2012

SUPPORTING EVIDENCE

IRRIGATED RICE

This is a world map of rice growing locations in the world.  Adam de Bremen, 1070, recorded that self seeding grain was one of the characteristics of Vinland.
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See the blue spot in the south west corner of Hudson Bay. Actually the more important site, which is too small to be shown, is the north and south Wide Rice Rivers east of the Red River in Minnesota.  How did self seeding rice get there?
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Self seeding rice is important in Viking history and the history of several American tribes around the Great Lakes.
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Notice the five regions where rice is found in North America: California, Great Lakes, Mississippi and Gulf coast, Cribbean and mid Atlantic Coast.  These regions are separated by long distances.  Human assistance would have been required to connect these five rice growing regions.  But because these regions exist along the pathways of recorded human travels in the ancient past, the regions become evidence that the ancient records are valid.
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It so happens that there are ancients records and other evidence that tells of human exploration along routes between the rice growing regions of today.  The rice regions in North America verify that the records and evidence are valid.
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First, the evidence of ancient human  traffic between Asia and America  on the Japanese current has been documented by many other ancient artifacts and by DNA. Haplogroup B is predominant in China and up to 70% of the women in western North America have Haplogroup BBut rice in Asia and California is another confirmation of the human contact between the two continents.
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Second,  the Chinese document, the Shan Hai Jing, describes five land journeys in North America of Chinese explorers.   These descriptions appear to tell of one time journeys   But they have an extensive knowledge  of North America geology.  This knowledge would require more than one journy which traveled over similar routes.
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One route shows the journey from California to Lake Winnipeg.  The Chinese would have been going for the pure copper around Lake Superior.  The copper trade lasted a thousand years;  So the human interaction between California rice  and the Great Lakes rice regions is a verification that the Lake Winnipeg route of the Shan Hai Jing is valid.  Those human journeys  recorded, over 4,ooo years ago may be why the blue dot in the south west corner of Hudson Bay appears on the map today. 

The long journey of Yu in 2,240 BC was a route from Mexico to Lake Winnipeg, CA.
Many 
Chinese may have followed the route.  They came for copper.
Some, who observed the swamps, may have brought rice along during return trips, 
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The Shan Hai Jing is still taught in Chinese schools as a myth.  My friend Ming Ko and her husband learned the myth in school.  
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About the same time as the Chinese journeys, men from Scandinavia rowed boats into Hudson Bay.  Then they pulled their boats up the Nelson River, rowed through Lake Winnipeg and pulled or rowed the boats up the Red River to the Wild Rice Rivers.  From there they portaged their boats over the N-S height of land into Big Cormorant Lake.  From this lake the crews floated, rowed, or pulled along a waterway through rivers and lakes until they reached the Mississippi River. The floated down the Mississippi to Minneapolis to pick up copper that had been floated down from Lake Superior.
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The copper traders then floated down the Mississippi.  The rice in the Wild Rice Rivers and the rice along the southern banks of the Mississippi verify the many jouneys made by the copper traders before 3,200 years ago, when the Bronze age ended.
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The spread of the rice through out the Caribbean and along the atlantic coast verify that many ships of the copper traders that passed through the area after they left the mouth of the Mississippi.  The Gulf stream conveyor floated them across the Atlantic.  The end of the men's travels was western Europe and the Baltic Sea.  
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The recorded movement of ancient men explains how the rice got into those five separated areas of North America.  The ancient stories and the evidence reinforce each other.  
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You need only to look at the trail of irrigated rice in North America to understand how some plants moved around the world.  The plants moved because many men were moving with a purpose.  At the same time a plant such as rice maintains a localized record to mark the route route those ancient men took.
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From China, through America, to the Baltic Sea, the local crops of rice along the way are modern dots outlining the travel of ancient man.
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Rydholm, Fred, Stroud, Larry, 2008, COPPER TRAIL, Abcuebt Aneruca Preservation Society.  Marquette, Michigan
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Rydholm, Fred, 2006, Michigan Cooper, The Untold Story, Winter Cabin Books, Marquette, MI

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TRADE OBJECTS
BUTTERNUTS
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By their nature objects that are traded become objects out of place.
One example, in America, is the Butternut.

The butternut was found in Newfoundland, but may have grown in Minnesota 
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These butternut shells and husks were found as objects out of place in Newfoundland.  Butternuts grow in Minnesota.
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Thus this trade object, butternuts, confirms that the Vikings were in North America before the Little Ice Age. Ancient butternuts found along the Viking trade routes are evidence that Norse people were trading throughout northern North America.
Fitzhugh, Ward, 2000, Vikings: The North Atlantic Saga. Washington, Smithsonian Institution. 
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The HONEN RUNE STONE
 About 1130 the Honen Rune Stone was carved in Norway for a
a high ranking Norwegian.  On the stone was this stanza.

'Ut'   "ok"   'vilt'    "ok"    "purfa'    "perre"
Out    and    good     and      Father       pray

*ok*  "ats"   Vin   land   "'a'"  'isa'
and      at       fine   land     ?        so  
  
I     ubygd    at       komen;
in   region    that    secret

"aud"     'ma'  illt        'vega'       doyi  "ar"
wealth      no   officer   recovers  that  year
[William Hovgaard, The Voyages of the Norsemen to America, 1914, page 114:]
[Translation by Myron Paine, Ph. D.  using the Viking and the Red Man.]

Three of the lines of this rune stone stanza conform to the
Drottkvaett format, which was followed to create self verifying packets of communication.
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The composer was apparently saying that he had been out to sea, the voyage was good as if God Blessed it.  "Father pray" could be a paraphrase of "God Bless", which was expected of a Drottkvaett composer.
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In Vinland he found that "secret wealth," which may have been Christianity because no officer or some one of higher rank could take that from him.
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[By 1914 the Norwegians had not translated the Honen stanza with a with a coherent understandable meaning. This was the time frame that the Norwegians destroyed Hjalmar Holand's credibility because they said the Kensington runes could not be valid.
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The translation above was made using Lenape words to find the meaning of a tome stone in Norway.  The Norwegian scholars have been a victim of the Pristine Wilderness paradigm.  
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They did not know how to interpret old runes in Norway, but they could not accept the evidence that similar Swedish runes were in America, where, they thought, only simple native lived.  
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The Norwegian "experts" and the Pristine Wilderness paradigm kept the Kensington rune stone out of the history books for over a century.]


The NIPIGON RELICS
About 1358 the Norway rescue fleet led by Paul Knutson reached the Norse Christians perhaps on the west side of James Bay.
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The oldest American history has a stanza (4.6) that implies that the Norse Christians from Greenland rejected the rescue.  A logical assumption would be that the rescue team adjusted their mission to assist the migration of the Norse Christian Lenape.  They wanted to get to Wynland of West in western Minnesota nearly 400 miles away.
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The known route was to take boats west to the Nelson River.  Then the crews might have rowed up the Nelson River, through Lake Winnipeg, and on up the Red River to reach Wynland of West.  The data shown on the Carte du Canada appears to indicate that this route was the one used.
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In the late 17th century Pierre-Esprit Radisson crossed from the Great Lakes to James Bay by canoe along the streams in the swampy ground south and west of James Bay.  The Current River tributaries of the Albert River, enable large boats to be rowed toward Nipigon watershed.  A short overland portage may have been possible.  Maybe the Scandinavian rescue crews were attempting to use the known water route for canoes via Lake Nipigon and Lake Superior.
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The oldest American history reports that the prince, probably Paul Knutson, died in a ship wreck with a submerged rock. (4.7)  Rapids and rocks on the river near Beardmore may have caused a boat to capsize.  Paul Knutson, who was weighed down with his personal metal tools, would have had a poor chance to survive.  

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The Beardmore relics may have belonged Paul Knudson.  They are of the correct time period. They are Norwegian.  They are typical of similar tools found at Wynland of West. They were found in a logical location in a voyage to see if large boats could be used to carry people on that route.  There is document of an known event that could have caused a Norse prince to die.




Monday, May 28, 2012

WHAT ARE the ODDS?

Could you help me calculate the odds?
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There is a good chance.  It’s my talent, you know.  What do you want to calculate the odds on?



I placed a mark on a Google Earth view of North America.  I put the mark where I thought Norse Christians settled in the 12th century and …
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 Zillion to one.  There were no Norse Christians in America in the 12th century.
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I have documentation from four different groups of authorities in the 11th and 12th centuries. One of those authorities wrote that the Norse were near an "Ocean discovered by many." 
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The only ocean beyond the Atlantic would have been the Pacific or maybe he meant Hudson Bay?
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He may have meant Hudson Bay, which was shown on French maps as "Mer Christian" until the 18th century.  There is physical evidence that their documentation was an accurate account of past events.  Assume I am correct and ...
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And?
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And calculate the odds of me placing a place mark within ten miles of a 14th century Norse artifact that I did not know was there.

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.You placed a mark on a Google image of North America, where you thought 12th century Norse Christians might have been. There was a 14th Century Norse artifact within ten miles?
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What are the odds?
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The realistic odds are now two zillion to one.  Neither the Norse Christians nor the Norse artifact were in North America then.  But the hypothetical odds to your delusional proposition are 188,000 to one. 
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How did you calculate the odds that fast? 
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Easy.  North America has 9,400,000 square miles.  An area of 50 square miles has a hypotenuse of ten miles.  So if you put your mark in any area of 50 square miles and if there was a Norse artifact in that area, the area would be one out of 188,000 such areas in North America.  .

How could you get it in your simple skull that the Norse Christians and the Norse artifact were where you placed the mark?
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You and I have different paradigms.  My paradigm is that many boats came to ancient American from many places at many different times.
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I cannot understand how someone, like you, who depends on the logic of numbers, can believe the Eurocentric Myth that not one boat landed in North America before the European invasion?
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The European Myth, as you call it, has to be correct.  We all learned that in school.  Scholars would not allow a myth to be repeated in history books if it were not true.
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Perhaps you are too trusting of scholars.  I learned in my youth that paper is a funny thing.  The paper just lies there.  Scholars can write lies on paper.  Most students read the paper and believe the lies to be true.
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Why would scholars lie?
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Why would a thief write that nobody was home, when, in fact, he killed the family and moved in over their dead bodies?
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A thief could not get away with that.
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Thieves did get away with it because the nearest authority was 3,000 miles away -- in England.  The thieves' stories were easy to believe in England.  The historians had already conned the people of England to believe that there were only a few pagan natives in the New World. 
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So, you say, the historians, back home in England, recorded the thieves’ lies because they reinforced the growing Eurocentric Myth? You have favorable odds for that statement.  
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Then the English historians entrenched the Eurocentric Myth by printing it in the history books.  Every scholar for four centuries has re-written the Myth as the gospel truth. 

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The first Europeans, who came to America, came from war-ravaged Europe, where Protestants and Catholics were slaughtering each other. Then the European Christians did not behave as we think, now, that Christians have always behaved.   
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What are the odds the paper, which the invaders of America wrote upon, was an accurate account of past events.
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When you phrase it like that, the odds against an accurate account of events would have been very high.  One of the first European actions was the Catholics massacring hundreds of Protestants.
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Then the Protestants returned to massacre the Catholics.  Nice time in the New World, huh? We rarely see that episode in school history books.  The historians have a hard time fitting those actual events into the Eurocentric Myth.
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They also have a hard time fitting the 12th century Norse Christians--the "family" that was home in America-- into the Eurocentric Myth.  So they leave it out.  
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The paradigm of many boats coming to America from many places at many different times has better odds of being correct than no single boat arriving ahead of the invasion.
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Well, maybe.  But there is no evidence.  You got to have evidence.
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Seven years ago I recorded the evidence of Norse Christians in America. I counted 129 Norse artifacts from 26 different states and provinces in North America. 
.What do you think the odds are now?
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Wait a minute!  You knew the area was not the whole of North America.  Define the area better.
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Norse artifacts have been found in an area from the outer banks of North Carolina to the Iowa-Nebraska border, then the boundary angles northwest to the Arctic Ocean, then east to Baffin Island, southeast to Labrador, and back to the outer banks.  Do not bother to calcite that area; it is about 2,800,000 square miles.
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Which lowers your odds to 56,000 to one for one artifact.  If 129 artifacts were randomly distributed in that area, your odds would be 434 to one. 
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Still high odds, but not formidable, But you say you recorded 129 artifacts.  You must have known about the Norse artifact near where you placed the mark, didn't you?
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I was recording data from many references.  Unless the artifacts seemed to be duplicates, I did not pay attention to where they were found.  So I do have the Norse artifact listed in my compilation.
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But, seven years later, when I was calculating the location of Wynland of West, I did not remember the artifact was in my old compilation.  I was not even thinking of my list of Norse artifacts, when I placed the mark.
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At 434 to one, you were still very lucky.
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Your odds are less than I thought they would be, but I like to think that finding a Norse artifact within ten miles of where I placed the mark was more than luck.
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What do you mean?
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The Kensington Stone, which was found in the 19th century, had text about men traveling 14 days to ships waiting for them.
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You mean the Kensington Rune Stone?.
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The Kensington Stone only has a few runes on it.  The text is mostly 14th century Swedish.  Anyway, while I was preparing for Norway Day in San Francisco, I went back to check some dates in a book written by Tornoe, a Norwegian historian.
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I noticed a section on Greenland that I had not remembered reading before.  Tornoe quoted a Pope in 1160, who wrote to the Archbishop in Trondheim, Norway.  The Pope wrote about his concern for the Christians beyond Greenland that were 12 days or more away from any other Norwegians..

You thought that "14 days to ships" and "12 days to Norwegians" might refer to the same journey?
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I had a hunch they did because I had learned during the past three years that the time from the Kensington Stone to Fargo-Moorhead was about two days by a crew in a crew rowed boat.
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A crew rowed boat?  Are you talking about a large canoe with the paddlers moving in rhythm?
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A large canoe could have been used.  But I visualize a narrow, long boat looking more or less like the narrow Viking Dragoon Ships.  So, if two days of rowing got the crews to Fargo-Moorhead, which was 12 days away from Norwegians in Hudson Bay, what are the odds?
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About the two trips of 12 days to Hudson Bay,  where friends would have been, being the same trip; maybe 55 to 45.  The trips do seem similar, starting from a common place. 
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In the past three years I discovered that the Nelson River, Lake Winnipeg, Red River route to Hudson Bay had been part of the transcontinental waterway, which was built several thousand years ago.
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Whoa, just a cotton-picking minute!  What transcontinental waterway?
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Do you remember the Bronze Age? 
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Yes, I read about it, and no.  No one remembers much about it.  It ended 3,200 years ago.  There are about 400 years of history missing before people started making records again.
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During the Bronze Age, for about a thousand years, an average of fifty ships a year came to America so the crews could load up with pure copper, which was found near the surface of the ground around Lake Superior.
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Fifty ships per year for 1,000 years!  Then they would have hauled away about--110 million pounds of pure copper.  That much copper would have equipped 300, 10 thousand man armies.  Is there evidence that we can bet on?
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Yes there is.  Those numbers are the most conservative estimates.  The evidence can still be seen.  At one time there were 10,000 holes about 30 feet across and 30 feet deep around Lake Superior.
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So what do all those 50,000 ships have to do with the transcontinental waterway?
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Some very smart men figured out a way to move heavy boats, like a Viking dragon ship, from the Red River Basin into the Mississippi River basin.  They figured out how to move the boat on water the whole way.  But sometimes the crew had to pull the boats up stream.
At Minneapolis, on the Mississippi, they loaded the boats with copper.   Then they floated down stream to the Gulf of Mexico.   Then back to Europe on the Gulf Stream.
The transcontinental waterway began just north of Fargo-Moorhead.  When the crews made the pulls upstream. They were able to walk though grass beside the streams.  So they could pull the boat up stream with no trees in the way.  
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They called the grassland "Wynland," which meant "fine land.".

OK, I get it.  The people back in Europe, who were drinking wine every day, thought the word meant, "Vine."  
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So you assumed that the Norse Christians were somewhere along the Nelson River, Lake Winnipeg, Red River route? 
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Your odds are down to 35 to one, if your understanding of the ancient sources is correct.  
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Why did the Norse Christians settle so far from the shore of Hudson Bay?
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The land between Fargo-Moorhead and Hudson Bay is like a giant swamp.  Even now the few people near the mouth of the Nelson River are called Swampy Cree.  Not many people can live in swamps.
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My friend, Steve Hilgren, who lives in western Minnesota, says that the Norse artifacts are found above a terrain feature called "Herman Beach."  Herman MN is at an elevation of 330 meters.  Fargo-Moorhead is at an elevation of about 270 meters.
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So, if the Norse Christians were along the Red River, the area suitable for settling was on the high land to the east.  Now your odds are down to 18 to one.  Did you, by any chance, have other information I do not know?
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I went back to read the 11th century authority, Adam de Bremen.
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Was he the "Vineland" guy?  Every authority and his kids have been searching for "Vineland" and not finding anything that I would bet on.
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That is part of the reason I started with your proposition a zillion to one odds.  Now you, devious devil, you got me to calculating that 50,000 ships would carry110 million pounds.  I think those odds are reasonable, when we think about 50 ships a year for 1000 years.
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Then the amount of nothing in 10,000 holes could have been where 110 million pounds of copper could have come from.
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Was the "Vineland" in western Minnesota?
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There are wine grapes in Minnesota, along with 18 other wild berries that could have made wine.
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Adam de Bremen wrote about "Vinland."  Translators in America from the 17th and 18th centuries wrote the "Vin" syllable as "Wyn" in America.  "Wyn" means, "fine, smooth, cleared."  The key word is "fine."
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All that definition does is confirm that the grassland in western Minnesota may have been the fine land where the Norse Christians may have settled.  Does not change the odds.
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But the confirmation made me feel more positive.  Adam de Bremen wrote more words about a self-seeding grain than he did about vines.
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Self-seeding grain?  You mean like wild rice?
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I thought so.  So I went back to check the odd pictograph 3.9 in the oldest American history.  It shows the younger brothers slithering through reeds that might be wild rice. 

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Then, when I looked at a map of western Minnesota, I noticed something I had not paid attention to before.
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What was that?
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There is a Wild Rice River on the east side of the Red River just north of the Buffalo River.  The Buffalo River was the northern entry of the transcontinental water way.
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The Kensington Stone has the words from "Vinland of West" on it.  Wynland of West might have been on the high ground north and east of the Buffalo River mouth near the Wild Rice River.
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Now you are down to about 9 to one odds..

Probably less than that.  I knew Holand had found two Norse Artifacts on the Red River near that location.  You calculated the odds assuming an even distribution of artifacts across northeast America.
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But I know that Minnesota had an unusually high number.  I had counted up to 26.  Steve Hilgren has found more than five more.

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Oh! You have not dealt me all the cards.  Now I am thinking that If you did NOT find a Norse artifact, you would have been going against the odds.
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I chose the land to the south of the south fork of the Wild Rice River.  The elevation is higher than 330 meters.  I placed my mark and then turned on the place names feature in Google Earth.  There are five, or more, towns nearby with Norse names:  Ulen, Ogema, Hitterdal, Waubun, Mahnomen, and, maybe, Syre.

.Wait a cotton-picking minute You are trying to tell me those names have endured for over 600 years?
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About 15 to 25 percent of the names in northeast America are Norse. They are usually found on the small towns back from the main roads.  Most of the states and provinces in northeast America have Norse names.
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I think the historical process may have been that the invaders named the important places to show that the land was theirs. But the names of the small villages probably endured because whoever wandered into a village may have asked, "What do you call this place?".
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Sounds like unreliable information to me..
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Look. The defenders of the Eurocentric Myth seem to find a way smear the authenticity of any Norse artifact.  In this case the artifact was a ancient sword dug up by a plow.  Eurocentric minds said that similar swords were used by the French in the 18th century.".
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Newer artifacts used somewhere else do not change the odds that an ancient artifact may be very old..
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The origin of the sword was with the Roman Gladiators before the 5th century.
The Vikings were in half of Italy and in France in the 11th century.  The odds are very high that the prototype of the French sword came ashore in the 11th century in s Viking boat..

But the Eurocentric minds do not care to investigate further.  The bogus French reference is enough for them to remove the Viking Sword from serious evaluation.
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But in 1940 Reider T. Sherwin wrote on page 135 that "Ogema" means "high man" in Old Norse.  The Ogema web page shows that the Chippewa said "Ogema" meant "Chief."  Those statements are solid testimony from two different sources. The testimonies are harder to defeat.
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They can be ignored.  Words do not mean a thing. right?
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This double testimony is more valuable than one contested Norse artifact.  Still the Norse sword had been found where I predicted there would be a Norse artifact.

Ah, but you used the testimony to pick your mark.
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No, I did not.  I put a place mark on the Google Earth image without the place names turned on.  Then, after I learned that the five of the towns might have Old Norse names, I began to examine the town data on the Internet. .
I contacted people in Ulen, MN first.   I was hoping to find someone in Ulen who would write me an email about Norse artifacts in the area.  While I was waiting for an answer I searched the Internet further and found the web site for the Viking Sword.
The Viking Sword?"

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The sword was found within 10 miles of my place mark.  What are the odds of that!
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Odds, Hell. Now I see why you call our history "the Eurocentric Myth."  You figured out where to put your mark by believing testimony and evidence that has been in plain sight for centuries.
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Your mark landed in a nest of five or more Norse names and within 10 miles of a Norse artifact!  There are no odds for just good historical research.
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This episode clearly illustrates that the odds against historians re-writing early American history to include historical evidence and testimony must be terribly high.
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About a zillion to one.