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Monday, March 6, 2017

ROWBOAT to MER RICKA

T
ROWBOAT to MER RICKA


MER RICKA = OCEAN LANDS.
NOTICE: the oars appear to be out of sync.  But if the crew is rowing up-river, it is best to keep one set of oars in the water at all times.

Normally, the "sail" would have been lowered onto the brackets.  The fore Bracket is just in front of the man in white.

This is a twenty oar craft.  The front six oar slots are for people, who want to ride along.   They were expected to bring their own oar.  If no oar men used the slots the boat could carry more cargo.

The image of a Christian Traveler is appropriate.  The Catholics, who spoke Norse, standing on the shore knew Genesis and may have known more from the bishops, who had passed through before.

A Jesuit Bishop said to new priests, "You may do nearly anything you want to their land, but do NOT damage the waterways."

The bishop also said, "They will take you where ever you want, but it you pick up a paddle and start to use it, be sure you can paddle until sunset."

Americans had wheels for the toys of the kids.  But they did not use wheels for travel.  When we think about it, wheels and the axels caused a pain in the ass. 

Friday, February 3, 2017

BOOKS on NORSE in AMERICA before COLUMBUS

On Jun 7, 2013, at 3:25 PM, Cleo Johnson wrote:
Are there any books you would recommend our reading in order for us to have more background on the tour?  Cleo Johnson.
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Here is a very select list with comments to help guide your selection.  I suggest you read them in order if you can.  I find some of these books are so low priced that it is easier to buy than to wait for interlibrary loan.
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Goggle ABEbooks. 
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The list is by date, 
oldest first, 
then author 
and title.

Notice: Some of the books have existed for centuries.

This list is evidence of a systematic suppression by omission, which was started about AD 1610 by the English Protestants and is now entrenched in  North American school curriculums. 
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Academic professors should have, could have, made these books required reading for most Early American history courses.  
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The 1,000 year-old LENAPE History is available on line at LENAPE LAND
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1070 
Adam DE BREMEN,
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Descriptio Insularum Aquilonis, (quoted in Olsen and Bourne, The Northmen, Columbus, and Cabot, 1906)
.
1885
Danial G.BRINTON,
. The Lenape’ and their Legends,
 Philadelphia
. .
1891 
Eben Norton HORSFORD
.
 Norse Discovery of America,
 Boston, MA
.
1909
R. A. DOUGLAS-LITHGOW
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Native American Place Names of Massachusetts, Applewood Books, Bedford, MA
. .
1940
Reider T. SHERWIN,
. The Viking and The Red Man, 
. Vols. 1-2, Funk & Wagnalls Co., NY, 
Vols 3-8 private printing.  Eight Volumes, in 1940-42-44-46-48-50-53-56
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1941
Karl N.LLEWELLYN, 
and  E. Adamson Hoebel,
. The Cheyenne Way, 
U of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK.
. 
1958
Hjalmar R. HOLAND,
.  Explorations in America Before Columbus, Twayne Publishers, Inc., NY.
.
1965 
Farley Mowat,

 Westviking,
.
1966
Magnus Magnusson, and
Herman Palsson,
.  The Viking Sagas
.
1966
Charles H. HAPGOOD,
. Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings, 
Chilton Co., Philadelphia.
.
1966
Thomas E. LEE, 
. Archaeological Discoveries, Payne Bay Region, Ungava, University Lavel, Quebec, Canada.
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1970
THOMAS E. LEE

Archaeological Investigations of a Longhouse, Pamiok Island. Ungava,  University Lavel, Quebec, Canada.
.
1966
Ingstad Helge,
. LAND UNDER the POLE STAR
.
1972
James Robert Enterline,
. Viking America
.
1976
 Barry FELL

 America BC,
 Demeter Press, NY
.
1982
BARRY FELL 
. Bronze Age America, Little, Brown & Co., Boston MA
.
1998
Farley Mowat,
.  The Wayfarers,
.
2007
 Myron Paine,
 FROZEN TRAIL to MERICA, Talerman 
.
 2008,
Myron Paine, 
. FROZEN TRAIL to
MERICA, Walking to Merica.
.
2009
John Sorenson, an
Carl Johannessen, 
.
 World Trade and Biological Exchanges Before 1492, 
(on Amazon+electronic copy)

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

LENAPE HISTORY, WEEK 15, NORSE ARTIFACTS

NORSE ARTIFACTS
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Holand collected thirteen (13) 14th century artifacts.   Ten of them are shown below.  He found similar artifacts in the museums of Norway.  These artifacts appear to be ignored by Social Scientists, who write textbooks for early American History.
The Halberts might have come from King Magnus' court, 1355.

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There has been little written for kids to read about these Norse artifacts.  
Social Scientists, who ignore Holand, state that these 14th century tools were probably carried to America by 19th century immigrants.  

Holand had already written about evidence that made this statement is invalid.  There are a few modern American communities with higher density of modern Scandinavians, which have not yielded 14th century artifacts.  Warsau, Wisconsin is one example.

One of the halberds could not be found in Scandinavia.  How could 19th century immigrants carry a halberd to America, when that Halberd does not exist in Norway museums?
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This evidence contributes to the understanding that the Norse were in Wynland of West in the 14th century.  Yet Social Scientists, who do not do their homework, continue to pedal the myth that the poor Scandinavian immigrants, who were lured to America by the railroads, had enough spare luggage room so they could salt the earth of western Minnesota with the best steel tools of the 14th century. 

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

LENAPE HISTORY, WEEK 14, Part B, WHETSTONES

WHETSTONES
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Archaeologists, who do research on ancient sites, know that if they find a whetstone, they can be positive that Norse were in the neighborhood.
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This Whetstone, found by Steve Hilgren south east of Wynland, shows that Norse were in western Minnesota.  This artifact is evidence that the Norse skulls found by Thomas E. Lee are valid.  They were carbon dated to AD 1040.

Thus whetstones found in America may indicate Norse settlements in America dating back one thousand years. 
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A whetstone, similar to the one Hilgrenn found, was the only artifact found near to the Kensington Rune Stone.
A Whetstone similar to this was found near the Kensington Stone. 
It had a metal rod inside.

A comparable whetstone has been found in the Museums in Greenland.
Whetstone found in Greenland
________________

The major Copper Haulers route was south, out of the Christian Sea, up the Nelson River and across Lake Winnipeg.  At the south end of Lake Winnipeg the route went three ways: To Thunder Bay, north of Lake Superior, south, going up the Red River, and west toward Minot, ND then south to reach the northern bend of the Missouri.

If Norse had followed the Copper Route into North America, there should have been whetstones found along the routes.

Were there any whetstones found in the Dakotas?

The answer is, “None that we know about.”  

But South Dakota does have two Whetstone waterways.


The overview shows where they are.  The Whetstone River near Big Stone Lake (north east corner) would have been a place where Norse may have lived for extended periods.  It is a site with woods, water, and a large body of water near-by.



The Whetstone Creek near Geddes, SD, has similar terrain adjacent to a major water source.

Both Whetstone areas may have been the location of Norse people, who had “discreetly slipped away” and populated eastern North America during the two hundred years before the Little Ice Age.

Compare the 200 year span to the 240 years the United States has existed.  There was adequate time for the Norse to populate eastern Norse America.  The evidence shows that they did.

When “No one turned back,” the LENAPE may have known their relatives were living in better conditions in areas to the west.

_____________________________________

Thursday, January 15, 2015

THE DIKES AT ALEXANDER LAKE

Tom Tomlinson, who lives in Norway, formed a Kensington Runestone support group in FACEBOOK.  I. Myon, used to be an active member.  Until I realized that most people, mainly Americans, were making unintelligent comments, because they were not doing their homework.  They were NOT looking at the tons of evidence or reading the reams of testimony about the Kensington Runestone.
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I begin to tell my audiences that the KRS support group was "stomping in the Mystery swamp."  By that phrase I meant that all our stomping around, verbally, without sifting through the evidence and testimony of past was just increasing the "Mystery" of the Kensington Rune stone.
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So I left the KRS support group.  I devoted my "extra" time to organizing a Viking Waterway tour of the Pelican River in Minnesota.
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The Pelican River is sixty miles of man modified river that connects the Red River of the North to the Mississippi river of the south.  The Lenape (Norse) used the waterway a thousand years ago to create a land where the people spoke Old Norse from Hudson Bay to the Isthmus of Panama.
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When Hjelmar Holland wrote about the Kensington Runestone in 1958 he wrote about the evidence and the testimony he, personally, had examined.  He also made some logical conclusions.  One of those conclusions was a map he drew in 1928 that laid out the Viking Waterway.
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You do not have to "stomp in the swamp."  You do not have spend a bundle of money traveling to North America. All you need to do is your homework.  One of the modern tools you can use is Google Earth.
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With Google earth, you can virtually look down on the Viking Waterway.  If you do, you might begin to realize, as I did, "Oh, My God! Every place Holland mentions has a boat harbor.  Every harbor has features that could have been made in the past by a multitude of men moving earth!  How can that be?"
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Fortunately for me, I had gone to meetings with an odd little group of people, who call themselves the "Ancient American Preservation Society."  At the meeting where I first attended, I learned that their guidelines were to "lay it all (evidence and testimony) on the table."  Most of the speakers were expected to have done their homework.  The audience had.  The questions were many and focused on the stuff on the table.
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There, that first night, Fred Rydholm, talked about copper around Lake Superior.  Fred's booming voice informed me that the pure copper removed from Lake Superior was enough to fuel the Bronze Age of Europe.  When I got home, I checked Fred's testimony.  I concluded he was correct.
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So, as Google Earth revealed harbor after man-modified harbor where Holland said the mooring stones were, my mind begin to envision a multitude, maybe thousands of men pulling hundreds of boats from western Minnesota from the Red River to the Mississippi River.
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You can do your homework by reading my research web site and my five blogs.  I hope you do.  But while I wait, I want to tell you about the best evidence, other than the thousands of mining pits, that multitudes of men came to America to take away tons of pure copper near the surface of Lake Superior.
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On January 15, I wrote to Tom, in Norway:
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"This image and the four to follow will present the evidence to support the hypothesis that 3,700 years ago the Alexandria, MN area was a large lake. 
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 "We still need to refine the size of the lake from existing contour maps.
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"But most of the lakes shown below the DIKES are at a lower elevation than the Lakes above the DIKES.  Most of lakes east of the DAM site are lower than the lakes west of the DAM.  The DAM and the DIKES only had to  be thirty feet higher than the existing waterway (for the DAM) or ground (for the DIKES.) 
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"Ancient earth moving evidence of even larger magnitudes still exist in the U. S." (Ref: to Cahokia Mound).
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Use your imagination.
__________________________________________
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"During the Bronze age, when the Copper Haulers came down the Pomme de Terre river from the northwest, they reached a spot, where the river swung southwest.  At that spot, they unloaded the supplies from their boats.  The local porters carried the supplies a few miles over a slight ridge. The porters reloaded boats waiting in the big lake to the east.
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."A day later the boats, which had been rowed east on the big lake, would have slithered down the DAM spillway with water flowing under them.  When they reached the lower lake, even further east, the next stop was the small place to sit and lie, while the local porters loaded five tons of Copper into the booats. (They called it "Minni" (small) "app" (sit) "Lys" (lie).
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"Maybe you have heard of that ancient place,"Minneapolis." That is odd.  Your teachers should have told you that North America was a pristine wilderness before Columbus did not land on the continent.  If America was a pristine wilderness, how can we know about an ancient place called Minneapolis?
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"Seems like the 17th century White Anglo saxon Protestants (WASP)s did not like to admit the people on the shore were Norse.  The WASPs had some silly little thing about Rights of Discovery.  Seems like most people would understand that the Norse people on the shore would have discovered the place first.  The educated WASPs understood that too.  But they omitted that knowledge from their version of North American History.
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"After the boats were loaded, the waves may have lapped to the gunnels.  The next stop would have been Yucatan.  They would stay in a region they called "my place." "MA" (My) "YA" (place), Maya.  There, they would have found food, fauna, and females.  The next spring they, and the copper, floated on the Gulf Steam back to Europe before hurricane season.
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"But back in Minnesota, A fewer younger men guided the empty boats down the Pomne de Terre River to a place to portage boats over nearly level ground.  The porters walked down to the boat portage place.   Probably they moved the boat via rollers. The porters pulled the boats on rollers to the ship way river.
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"Chipp (Ship) ewa (way, "Chippewa."  Ever see the cartons of butter the people in Land O' Lakes still make? The lovely Chippewa maiden on the carton makes some of the best tasting butter.
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"Then the few younger men and boat loads of porters floated down the Chippewa River to the tributary going northwest, toward the place where the young men would find their kinfolk.  They called it "Kin's place town").  "Kens" (kins) "ing" (place) "ton" town. Kensington.
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They have a rock near there, which was carved thousands of years later.  But it must not exist.  Your kids cannot find it in the history books.  Odd?  My dad often used the phase, "Carved in stone." to mean something was absolutely real.  How can a message carved in stone not show up in the history books?
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"Oh! I forget,--no Norse were allowed in WASP history.
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"While the young men visited with their kin, the porters pulled the boats further upstream up to the dikes.  Then they opened the sluice gate.  They pulled the boats, floating on flowing water, into the big lake.  The big lake was teaming with boats, men, food, fauna, fur, and females.  The older men, who had been around, said that had seen a place that before.  They called it "Alexander,"
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The Dikes at Alexander Lake
This is the Alexander, Minnesota area showing the Dikes on the south side of what used be, 3,700 years ago, the Alexander Lake. As large bodies of water go, the lake was relatively shallow.  Earth to build dams and dikes required only 30 feet in elevation.  The low elevation  enabled the Copper Haulers to move supplies over water by boats rather than carry the burden on their backs.
Contour map at the Lake of Alexander MN.
. 
The DAM is located out of the picture to the northeast. This red dots outline the dike area that will be shown in detail later. Notice the narrow configuration of the earth mounds and the consistent line of those mounds from East to West. 

There does not appear to be any visible water course that would have created these mounds.  So the best assumption is that these dikes are man made.
The important elevation appears to be 1,400 feet.  That elevation can be seen near the top of the dike in the center.
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West of the dikes (around Salem Ch.) the ground exhibits a pattern that may have been caused by ice and water erosions, which took place for ten or more centuries.  If the DAM site was choked with ice, the expanding lake ice driven by the north wind may have pushed into a weak section of dikes.  Then the "break out" may have happened. That repeated erosion of the following centuries might have removed most of the traces of dikes.
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Significantly, just west of the Salem Ch. the ground rises rapidly to more than 1,400 feet.  My pencil was resting on that point, while I was asking, "If this area to the east was a lake, what held the water from flowing to the southwest?
..
Only THEN, did I recognize the dikes.
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The 1,350 elevation line may indicate the base of dikes, which may have been 50 feet higher nearly four millennium ago.
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Alexandria Lake did exist!!  Alexandria Lake was man-modified to have a lake surface of about 1,400 feet.  The thousands of men, who pulled their hundreds of boats to an elevation of 1,400 feet, were there to haul copper to Europe.  Their winter resting place at Maya was a long float downstream with a few portages at the start.
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View of the Dikes at Alexander Lake
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We are on a bus going toward runestone park.  We have just passed the road that turns off to the water "ladder." Robin took this picture without guidance, except for a vague verbal statement that "The dikes are out here somewhere." 
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The bus was approaching Runestone park from the southwest.
Robin took this picture through the front window of the tour bus.  
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If you look close, you can see the dikes.  Their elevation is shown by the light spots--the sky beyond the dikes-- through the trees.

                Assisted view of the Dikes at Alexander Lake
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The white line on the right and the red line on the left indicate the top of the dikes. The bus was located somewhere nea the east end of the pull from the Chippewa river.   The start of the water "ladder" into Alexandria Lake was to the right and behind us.
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I slumped back into my seat with disappointment.  After months of planning, and growing anticipation to find real evidence at that spot, I had missed the driveway to the water "ladder!" We were running behind schedule.  I did not know what Robin was doing.  I thought I had blown the most important scene. 
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But LOOK!

You can see dikes made about 3,700 years ago by men, who came to America to haul the pure copper back to the Mediterranean so those guys like Goliath could wear a copper breastplate and a bronze helmet.
An image of the water "ladder."
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The black line indicates the probable path, over which the men pulled empty boats floating on a shallow stream of water. 
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The guys had pulled boats upstream on flowing water many times since they started up the Nelson River a year before. Now they had pulled their boat 1400 feet above sea level. 
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From here to Maya, the water flowed downstream.  After a night  or two of R&R, they were going to row west to pick up a load of incoming supplies.  Then they were going to row east, slither down the spillway, sit and lie at that little campgroumd, then float down the father of waters, MISSISSIPPI,  to the warm spot they loved to call MAYA. Life was good and getting better!
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Best of all they would have a chance to come back to have the adventure again because NOBODY would ever know, where all that copper came from.



Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Holands's 1928 drawing of the Viking Waterway.

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The Viking Waterway
connected the Red River watershed
to the Mississippi watershed
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Thus creating a waterway capable of floating
small knarr boats with 
crews fifteen or sixteen men
on a Viking voyage from
the Hudson Bay to the Gulf of Mexico.
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Viking knarr having 
seven rowers per side
would be an example of the boat
 that traversed America.
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The map above was made in 1928
by Hjalmar Holand.
It took until 1956 to publish the information
in "Explorers in America Before Columbus."
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The triangles represent mooring stones.
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Harbors, most man modified,
are seen via Google Earth
near each mooring stone.
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A huge number of slaves
(Asia minor and Europe was full of slaves then)
may have been carried in by ship and boats
to modify the natural harbors
to enable the knarr to float on water
from Hudson Bay to the Gulf of Mexico.
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Myron D Paine, Ph. D. [Engineering]
traced the transcontinental waterway
February 28, 2010 
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Beginning of the Minnesota waterway passage in 1362

Buffalo River comes from the east.  In spring the waters may be fast.  But notice that the river runs through country that would have been prairie in the 14th century.  A crew of 30 men could have pulled a heavy (Holand estimated 1,500 pounds) longboar upriver.

Possibly there might have been men with pulling ropes on both sides of the river.  The river rises 300 feet in about 90 miles.  The boat may have been pulled, but it was floating on water.  The pulling task may have taken 3 to 5 days.


[Click on photos for a larger view.]

Junction of Buffalo River and Red River